A Dream Hike: Mt. Timpanogos

0
439
Skiing at Snowbird with Polly Creveling

One mountain peak that stands above most in the Wasatch front is Mt. Timpanogos, also referred to as Timp. Technically speaking, it is the second highest peak behind Mt. Nebo, standing at 11,752 ft. However, between the two, Mt. Timpanogos is much more picturesque, and it is one of the most prominent mountains in Utah. It’s one I have yet to climb myself. Someday, I hope to. For now it sits on my list of “must do.”

On my very first mountain peak summit last year on Twin Peaks Salt Lake, I was able to see the tallest peaks in every direction from Ben Lomond down to Mt. Nebo. Being at the top of a mountain provides a unique prospective for anyone. You feel as though you are touching the heavens above. Climbing mountain peaks become more addictive the higher and higher you go.

Growing up in Salt Lake has put me around the base of Mt. Timpanogos many times. I’ve also seen so many different perspectives of Timp that I finally think it is time to conquer one of my missions to climb to the top. I have seen Timp driving through Provo, downhill skiing at Sundance, and riding on the Heber Creeper in Heber. Many of my friends have climbed Timp in the summer and told me what the hike was like. Most of them said it took an entire day to reach the summit — but they all said it was well worth it.

The hike to the top from American Fork canyon is a 15 mile round trip in the summertime. I would really like to climb to the top in the winter or early spring while there is still snow at the top, even though I would need to take more care to ensure that the snow is stable to walk on when the temperature increases. This is because I feel as though the mountaineering aspect of climbing to the top of mountain peaks is what draws me. I want to be able to look down on everything around me still blanketed with snow, reflecting the bright sunlight. I had a small taste of this feeling when I went on a backpacking trip to King’s Peak, the highest point in Utah at 13,528 feet. Being above the timberline is stunning knowing that other creatures do not venture above that height. The rock features are so unique that the only way to explore them is to go up.

In the mental planning I have already done, I know to go on a hike up to the top of Mt. Timpanogos, I would need a daypack at minimum with plenty of water. I know there are streams on the way up, but that I would need to rely on my own water bottle once I climbed beyond them. The view would be impeccable, especially looking North towards the South side of the Pfeifferhorn. If I was lucky on my adventure to the top, I might even come across a mountain goat just strolling along the cliffside. When I got to the top, I would be sure to have friends with me to enjoy the hike along with my camera to document every step of the way. After all, how would others know that I am having fun without seeing images in this technological world we live in? Last but not least, I would bring a University of Utah flag to wave at the top just so those at BYU could see that a Utah flag was towering above them.

k.creveling@wasatchmag.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here