c.webber Author Carolyn Webber is a hiker, climber, snowboarder, and outdoor journalist from Sandy, UT. She’s a senior studying Journalism and Anthropology at the University of Utah and editor of Wasatch Magazine. She loves adventuring in the Wasatch and beyond year-round and is looking forward to taking on the Pacific Crest Trail with a backpack this summer.

Faultline Winners

Last week, Wasatch Magazine hosted the very first Faultline Film Awards. Students and locals from up and down the Wasatch submitted their films, and after the results came in, we showcased the winners and honorable mentions during a night of films. Films were judged on use of theme, creativity, editing/flow, and coherence/story. Here are the winners and their awards:

 

Fall Activities-

Swellsgiving by Cassidy Eames (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hji-wbbCAM)

$100 cash prize

 

Winter Sports-

Wasatch Wanderer by Colby Angelos (https://vimeo.com/202142604)

Pair of Aura Optics Cirrus Goggles and $50 cash prize

 

Environmental Justice

Suffocate by Tyson Whitney (https://vimeo.com/134980034)

$100 cash prize

 

Love for the Wasatch Front

Unruly Things by KUER RadioWest (https://vimeo.com/127875314)

$100 cash prize

 

Thanks to everyone who participated in our first biannual event. Start getting films ready for the next Faultline Film Awards. We’ll see you in the fall!

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This Land Was Made For You and Me

Last fall, I went on a road trip up the California and Oregon Coast. For a large portion of our drive, thick, burly redwood trees created an enveloping tunnel that kept me spellbound. I realized these 500 to 2,000 year-old trees claimed this land before anyone else, and I felt privileged to share it with them.

People have cried for land conservation and public land designation for decades, and the National Park Service celebrated its monumental 100th birthday just last year. However, some have forgotten just how defining these lands are to our national identity. “This Land Is Your Land” sings about the “sparkling sands of her diamond deserts,” which may refer to the White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, or maybe the “golden valleys” speaks of Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. From the Redwood Forest National Park to the Gulf Stream waters found in Biscayne National Park, this land was made for us to enjoy.

Many have felt a rising threat against these lands, and the outdoor industry is leading a cause to protect them (see more on this story on page 10). We at Wasatch Magazine love public lands because of the life-changing, inspiring experiences we’ve had exploring them. The granite slabs we climb and the rocky trails we mountain bike along the Wasatch reside within U.S. Forest Service land. This past year, I backpacked and hiked around six national parks, and am grateful for the lands we collectively own.

This Land is Your Land. This Land is My Land.  Whether you prefer mountains, desert, sea, or sky, recreationists of all types have used the millions of acres in national parks, state parks, and Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service land. I fell in love with the outdoors trail running along the Bonneville Shoreline — where was it for you? As always, our advice is to get outside, but it’s also to protect and preserve that land we love. After all, this land was made for you and me.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

Wasatch Editor

Photo courtesy of Mckenzie Wadsworth

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Patagonia withdraws from Outdoor Retailer

Patagonia, Inc., who threatened last month to leave Outdoor Retailer, pulled the cord. In a press release issued today, the outdoor clothing and gear company announced that it will not be attending the retail show in Utah anymore.

The action came from a resolution Utah Governor Gary Herbert signed last Friday, urging the Trump administration to rescind the Bears Ears National Monument. A statement signed by Rose Marcario, President and CEO of Patagonia, says, “Because of the hostile environment [elected officials] have created and their blatant disregard for Bears Ears National Monument and other public lands, the backbone of our business, Patagonia will no longer attend the Outdoor Retailer show in Utah and we are confident other outdoor manufacturers and retailers will join us in moving our investment to a state that values our industry and promotes public lands conservation.”

Founder and former CEO of the company Yvon Choiunard released a statement last month threatening to leave if Gov. Herbert continued to sell public lands off to the “highest bidder.” While no other companies have officially stated that they will be leaving, it’s likely that more companies will follow suit.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

Photo courtesy of Patagonia

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Find Your Pitch, Ice Climbing close to home

Climbers have three options in the winter: drive south, go indoors, or layer up and get on some ice. If you haven’t yet tried option number three, there is still time, the season isn’t over yet. Yes, attaching metal spikes to your feet and holding on by the tip of an ice axe can be a little intimidating, but there are few epic adventures more brag-worthy than standing atop a pillar of ice. Try it once, and you’ll be hooked.

Most people have their baptism by ice at Ouray Ice Park in Colorado: the perfect launch pad for an ice climbing career. The man-made ice is reliable and thick, while in the Wasatch, fluctuating weather patterns and avalanches make route finding a little more fickle.  For those sick of following a Candy Lane trail of colored, chalked-up holds in the gym, put your gloves on instead and try these ice climbing routes.

PROVO CANYON

After driving up this canyon, park at the Bridal Veils parking lot, and you will find another vehicle full of climbers. Accessibility and consistent ice make this place a little crowded, but there is a high concentration of climbs here. Access the famous Stairway to Heaven just off the trail, a multi-pitch climb that can reach up to 10 pitches during a good ice season. The first pitch, lovingly called The Apron because of its width, is easy to set up a top-rope on and do laps. There are a few bolts at the top, so you can hop between routes if you are in a bigger group.

If you keep walking up the trail before turning toward the Stairway area, you will come to the breathtaking Bridal Veil Falls. While it rarely freezes, there are a few fantastic climbs to the right of it. Ice leading experience is required.

LITTLE COTTONWOOD CANYON

You really can’t call yourself an ice climber and live in Utah without climbing the Great White Icicle. It’s a classic multi-pitch easily accessible off the freeway. The views get better and better at the end of each of the four pitches, but don’t get distracted and forget to watch for falling ice. Because of high traffic, you will get hit with ice, so always wear a helmet. Once you’ve done this classic, you might as well hike over to Scruffy Band, a collection of ice dripping off granite slabs. You can switch easily between routes of easy grades.

MAPLE CANYON

When avalanche dangers are high in the Wasatch, Maple Canyon is the perfect alternative. Around every winding cobblestone corner, ice pours into perfect climbing routes. There are several routes accessible off the Main Road, but Box Canyon and Left Fork also reveal hidden treasures. Tennis Shoe Slab is long but sustained, and the intimidating Dagger is just around the corner, suspended over an easy first pitch that has set chains. The Wet Itchies and Bowling Ball Head are a little more steep, but fun if you are ready to push yourself.

JOE’S VALLEY

This famous bouldering destination also has stellar ice in the winter months. The CCC and Donoricicle are both breathtaking pillars of thick ice that just taunt you to climb them. A top rope can easily be set up at the Donoricicle, but leading experience is necessary for the two pitches of the CCC. A plus here is the belayer isn’t stuck with a bad view, the frozen Joe’s Reservoir and surrounding mountainous landscape are visible below.

**If you are going ice climbing in Utah, purchase the detailed guide “Beehive Ice” by Nathan Smith and Andrew Burr. Also, check avalanche conditions prior to the climb and check equipment constantly throughout.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

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Carpool up the canyons

As bus riders grabbed their skis and stepped off toward the lifts last Friday, they were met with a pleasant surprise — a free beanie and a thumbs up from enthusiastic people heading the POW Day event. POW Day, which began last year through a partnership with Protect Our Winters (POW), Ski Utah, and local resorts Snowbird and Alta, was such a success that they decided to expand it this season to Powder Mountain and Sundance.

For the Cottonwood resorts, the day was representative of a bigger initiative taking place all season long. Snowbird’s new program, RIDE (Reducing Individual Driving for the Environment), incentivizes carpoolers and bus riders, said Hilary Arens, Snowbird’s Director of Water Resources and Environmental Programs.

Arens knows what all skiers want: “Time, money, and powder,” she said.

Those carpooling with three or more skiers or riders receive VIP parking close to the lifts by Entry 1 and Entry 2. Besides proximity to fresh tracks, they also receive a punch card that, after 10 times carpooling, they can redeem for a transferrable half-priced Snowbird day pass. Monthly, Snowbird will select twenty season pass holders who ride UTA to receive a half-priced day pass as well.

Carpoolers participating in RIDE also enter a raffle, in which eight people are selected for a once in a lifetime early-up ride on Gadzoom. One bus rider and one employee are chosen for this event too, which will take place a few times a season.

Snowbird teamed up with POW, Breathe Utah, Canyon Transportation, and UTA to design and launch the RIDE program and, soon, similar benefits will spring up at Alta, Brighton, and Solitude ski resorts. Snowbird worked with UTA to improve the frequency and reliability of their buses, and season passes double as a UTA pass. This is a cost Snowbird incurs, said Brian Brown, director of marketing for Snowbird, but any extra incentive to reduce traffic in the canyon is worth it.

“We believe we can make a difference, even if it’s a small one,” he said. “I am 100 percent confident that over time, this program is going to pay off and we are going to have less people driving up the canyons.”

At POW Day, that difference was calculated at a reduction of 24,197 lbs of CO2 for the four participating resorts, according to Paul Marshall, spokesperson for Ski Utah.

“With a tree absorbing an average of 48 lbs of CO2 annually, POW Day saved as much CO2 as 184,000 trees would absorb in one day. With a healthy forest density of 75 trees per acre, this is equivalent to 2,455 acres of trees, or all of Snowbird,” Marshall said.

This was the first year Ski Utah tracked results, which they did thanks to people registering via the SNOCRU app, and they hope to increase those numbers each year. But, there’s no need to wait for next POW Day to make a difference; each time riders carpool to Snowbird with three or more people, they are keeping 40 pounds of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

“There is a carbon fee to come ski. To come up these canyons, to run the chairlifts and the buses,” Arens said. “So, the best thing that we ask of our employees and guests is to offset that by coming up together and reducing Snowbird’s carbon footprint.”

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

Photo courtesy of Chris Segal

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Get ready for POW Day

If you’ve ever skied or boarded Big or Little Cottonwood Canyon on a Saturday, you know the frustration of the Disneyland-esque lines up to the resorts: Never-ending, and sometimes longer than the actual time spent having fun.
Protect Our Winters (POW) and Ski Utah have come up with a solution that they call POW Day. On Friday, Jan. 13 (the snowiest day in Utah according to 50 years of data) anyone carpooling with three or more skiers/riders per vehicle or anyone riding a UTA bus to the resort will be rewarded. They can expect priority parking, POW Day beanies from Discrete, and an opportunity to ski or snowboard with a POW athlete such as Caroline Gleich, Forrest Shearer and Brody Leven. The event will take place at Alta, Snowbird, Powder Mountain, and Sundance beginning at 8 a.m. The POW Tent, at the base of each participating ski area, will give out raffle tickets and check in carpoolers and UTA riders. From 2:30 to 4 p.m., there will be a party with giveaways, DJs, and speeches about climate change.
Paul Marshall, spokesperson for Ski Utah, said this event which began last year was created to address problems such as congestion in the canyons and inversion from carbon emissions.
“We’re trying to increase tourism but also protect this pristine product that we have,” he said. “We think taking these kind of steps and helping change habits by incentivizing people will help change their habits for the future.”
Plus, POW and Ski Utah want everyone to know how easy it is to use public transportation, considering everyone with a season pass in the Cottonwoods also has a free UTA pass. UTA has improved their bus service this year, meaning all day service to resorts from Powder Mountain to Sundance.
Also this year, POW Day teamed up with SNOCRU, a snowsports app that connects you to your friends while on the mountain. At the check-in tent, Ski Utah will help check people into the app to see just how many carbon emissions they will have reduced that day.
“This will give us a true number and something we can build off for years to come,” Marshall said.
While they did not track everyone who participated last year, Marshall said all 500 beanies were distributed, and they have doubled that amount this year.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

Photo courtesy of Ski Utah

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How to: sleep warm in the winter

Dragging yourself into the snow and away from the cozy confines of your heated home can be difficult. However, for those of us addicted to the outdoors, we find ways to make adventuring in the winter bearable. Here we’ve got some tips for staying warm while sleeping in the snow.

Gear: An insulated sleeping pad is worth every pound, and you can find some for even less weight than that. Look for at least an inch of thickness to keep you off the cold ground. Bring a sleeping bag rated at 10 degree Fahrenheit or lower. Down sleeping bags help retain body heat extremely well, but be sure to keep it dry. Four-season tents are preferred because of their insulation, plus, you don’t want mesh fabric letting bitter cold wind sneak through.

Location, location: Pick a spot with a lot of trees around to block wind. Steer clear of sites by a river or lake, low-lying meadows, or summits, as they tend to be colder. When setting up your tent, check that the door is facing away from the wind.

Prep: Eat a big dinner filled with fats and proteins, because it will take your body a longer time to digest them. Go to the bathroom before bunkering down. And then go again. You do not want to wake up in the middle of the night to relieve yourself. Do some jumping jacks or crunches, as this will create body heat you can trap in your bag (just make sure it’s not so much that you start sweating).

Stay dry: The age-old trick of sleeping naked to stay warm only works if your other option is to sleep in wet clothing. Take all wet clothing off, and choose synthetic, silk, or wool fabrics for PJs. Make sure everything is dry on your body too, such as feet and hair.

Layer up: Throw all your extra clothes at the bottom by your feet. Tuck everything in tight so you don’t lose heat. Place a water bottle filled with hot water (maybe left over from cooking dinner) into the sack with you. Wear a hat and cinch the sleeping bag tight around your head.

Trying winter camping for the first time can be daunting, but once you master sleeping warm, you’ll keep your backpack ready for adventure all winter long.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

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Bouldering Competition Tonight

Get ready to send it. Today, students, staff, and faculty at the U are competing in the second annual SENDsations bouldering competition, sponsored by the U’s Outdoor Adventures.
Climbing will begin around 4:30 p.m. and go for about two hours in The Summit, the George S. Eccles Student Life Center’s climbing wall. Competitors can climb as many bouldering problems as they want during that time and will receive points based on the difficulty of the routes they complete- which were all set by the U’s Climbing Team. Judges will choose the top three men and women for the finals, and after the best climbers duke it out, they will announce winners.
With sponsors like Petzl, Black Diamond, CoalaTree, and Deuter, winners (and most participants) can plan to walk away with such gear as chalk bags, t-shirts, and crash pads.
Keith Howells, GA of operations at Outdoor Adventures, said as of this morning, 40 of the 60 spots are taken, and while people can sign up for the competition at the door, he strongly suggests signing up before time online. The entrance fee is $5.
This event is one of two bouldering competitions Outdoor Adventures hosts during the school year. The other is the Dyno Comp during spring semester.
“I think overall these events like SENDsations are an opportunity for the U of U climbing community to get together at The Summit, build each other up as fellow climbers, and have a lot of fun while doing what they love,” Howells said. “For me, there’s no community quite like the climbing community.”


c.webber@wasatchmag.com

Photo courtesy of University of Utah Outdoor Adventures

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A Tinfoil Thanksgiving: Four of our Favorite Recipes

Near-naked trees and chilling temps can only mean one thing: ‘tis the season to load up on food and shrug off your guilt. The United States has even dedicated a holiday for you to stuff your belly and build up extra “layers” for the winter months. However, Thanksgiving suggests a four-day weekend, which tempts many outdoor adventurists to ditch family dinners and escape into nature. Lucky for you, we’ve found ways to bring Thanksgiving to the wilderness, so you can binge eat and give thanks for this beautiful world while being surrounded by it.

THANKSGIVING HOBO DINNER

10 turkey cutlets

2 cans of gravy

1 bag of frozen green beans and carrots

1 package of cranberries

Pour an inch-layer of gravy on the bottom. Place the turkey cutlet on top. Sprinkle frozen green beans and carrots over the turkey. Top with more gravy and a handful of cranberries. Wrap up and place in the fire. Repeat.

Cook time: 20 minutes

Tip: Don’t use all the gravy in food prep. You’ll want some to pour over after the meal is cooked.

POTATOES AU TINFOIL

1 can of cream of chicken/mushroom soup

2 lbs. of small yellow potatoes

1 onion

1 bag of shredded cheese

Salt and pepper

Spread a layer of soup on the bottom. Cut the potatoes into thin slices and place 3-4 potatoes, worth on top. Slice onion and add. Add salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle a handful of cheese, seal, and place in fire. Repeat.

Cook time: 30 minutes

Tip: Potatoes often take the longest to cook, but the thinner you cut them, the quicker they soften.

Photo by Chris Hammock

Photo by Chris Hammock

MOM’S SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE

3 medium-sized sweet potatoes

1 cup of brown sugar

2 tablespoons of butter

1 cup of marshmallows

4 sheets of graham crackers

Chocolate bars (optional)

Dice the sweet potatoes and toss onto the tinfoil with cubed butter and brown sugar. Wrap up and place in the fire. After you pull the food out, open and place marshmallows, graham crackers and, if desired, chocolate, onto the steaming potatoes.

Cook time: 20 minutes

Tip: Try to keep the brown sugar toward the center of the potatoes or it will quickly burn.

APPLE PIE-IN-A-HOLE

6 apples

1 cup of brown sugar

2 tablespoons of butter

¾ cup of rolled oats

Cinnamon

Cut the core out of the apple. Dice butter and place a few cubes inside the hole, along with brown sugar, cinnamon, and rolled oats. Wrap in tinfoil and toss in the fire.

Cook time: 15 minutes

Almost all of these recipes received thumbs up and smiles from the Wasatch crew on a staff camping trip. Enjoy!

c.webber@dailyutahchronicle.com

@carolyn_webber

Feature photo by Kiffer Creveling

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Settle in for a Slick Ski Season

Powder is on its way.

At Ski Utah’s kickoff to the ski season yesterday, that was the resounding message. Representatives from ski resorts and Utah’s Office of Tourism gathered with media members to hear Nathan Rafferty, president and CEO of Ski Utah, discuss the prospects of the upcoming season.

Many ski resorts, such as Sundance, Cherry Peak, and Powder Mountain, are increasing access with new ski lifts. Snowbird and Brian Head have expanded buildings for ski school and restaurants. But, all the resorts have a resounding theme —

“Snow guns are at the ready,” Rafferty said.

Since last year broke records from the 2007-08 season for number of visitors, Rafferty and others are hopeful that this year the momentum will keep going. Of course, everyone is doing it in different ways.

For resorts like Powder Mountain, they want to keep the number of visitors high, but not so high that they lose their iconic seclusion. They have decided to limit the amount of season pass holders to 1,000 and day passes to 2,000.

“We don’t want to change. We want to keep our little resort feel,” said JP Goulet, marketing manager for Powder Mountain. “We want you to look around and have no one around you.”

Since they are adding two new chair lifts and adding another 600 acres to their resort, that goal is feasible. The lifts are expected to be running by Dec. 15. While Powder Mountain doesn’t have a set opening day (since they don’t make their own snow), Goulet is confident they will be running by the first week of December.

Other resorts are hoping to open starting next week.

Brighton is celebrating its 80th year of operation, Solitude is re-modeling their mountain lodge, and Snowbird is starting a program to support carpooling and public transportation use. While many are worried about the lack of snow, the resorts know sooner or later, it will come.

Rafferty wants everyone to remember, “Utah always delivers when it comes to snow.”

c.webber@dailyutahchronicle.com

@carolyn_webber

Photo by Carolyn Webber

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