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Park City

Stoked Roasters: Coffee in Park City

Photo by Samira Guirguis.

Few coffee shop owners can say they’ve run a marathon, let alone, been the first woman to finish the Four Deserts Grand Slam Plus. Yeah, you heard me. That’s the Atacama, Gobi, Sahara, and Arctic deserts as well as Sri Lanka all in one calendar year, and she was crowned its 2016 Female World Champion. Jax Mariash has faced the whirling sand and glaring sun, temperatures that leave limbs numb, and has stood in spectacular environments that capture the essence of nature in its unadulterated form. What really animates Jax, is not the fact that she can endure long distance running, but that she loves coffee. So when Jax announced she was opening a coffee Roasting facility and tasting room in Hoodriver, OR, and now a coffee shop in Park City, UT on Main Street, no one doubted that she’d pull it off.

STOKED ROASTERS coffee is all about inspiring people to get outside and get “stoked” on their adventures while bringing craft coffee to the outdoor industry. People might think that that these two ideas don’t mix, but most outdoorsy people are very health

Photo by Samira Guirguis.

conscious about what goes into their bodies and environments. Whether that might be trying to live a summer on a vegetable garden or trying to support brands that invest in protecting national monuments. It would only make sense that this niche of people would seek out a coffee that aims to do that as well.

“Roasting coffee is like wine, where various green beans from different origins all carry unique flavor notes to them depending on what beans you choose or how long they are roasted. You get different gradients of coffee flavors when you produce a light roast, medium roast, or a dark roast,” Jax said proudly. What makes STOKED ROASTERS stand out from other coffee shops is that they don’t cut out the extra steps when roasting and watching every batch by the minute. STOKED ROASTERS has a variety of blends all named after different outdoor adventures such as Bluebird, Double Overhead, First Tracks, Soul Session, Dawn Patrol, and White Out. Furthermore, STOKED ROASTERS is the only coffee company to support a fleet of sponsored athletes.

Photo by Samira Guirguis.

Another signature that is making Jax’s coffee stand out in the outdoor community are her STOKED STIX instant coffee. Stoked will be wherever you might be, whether that is camping with your kids in the Wasatch or on a plane dreaming of heli-skiing. You will always have premium coffee with you in two roasts: medium roast and a dark roast. “Anything that is beyond the required is a luxury in the outdoors because you’re adding weight to your pack, but [coffee] was something I couldn’t do without,” laughs Jax. Every morning during the Grand Slam Plus she would have dehydrated muscle milk, oatmeal, and a STOKED STIX as her breakfast. STOKED STIX are good whether you are in isolated wildernesses or tramping through the urban jungle. This coffee shop is worth a try and it will give you the fuel to kick start your next adventure.

s.guirguis@wasatchmag.com

This article has been updated to reflect more accurate information.

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Changing the Way You Ski & Board

Sometimes it feels like Millenials and the generations that have followed are derided for almost everything they do. Whether or not this derision is always valid, the truth is, post-Baby Boomer generations are causing significant fractures and shifts in the way western societies function. One such fracture and shift is happening now in the ski and snowboard industry, a shift post-baby-boom generation Bryan Dunn and Luke Zirngibl have created the website SnowSearch to acknowledge.

SnowSearch.co’s homepage. Photo courtesy of SnowSearch.

“The U.S. ski industry is in a very interesting spot right now. It has historically, very much from a spending and engagement perspective, been driven by baby boomers who had a very specific set of travel habits. They were very loyal,” explains long-time snowboarder Dunn. “What’s happening with leisure/travel and being echoed in the ski industry is this departure from loyalty — loyalty to brands, loyalty to certain hotels in certain cities, and loyalty to ski resorts.”

According to Dunn, this drop in loyalty is coupled with a “desire to explore,” and to go beyond the few mountains they were raised on by those far more loyal baby boomers.

The ski and boarding industry has noticed this shift in part, which has led to the rise

SnowSearch co-founder Bryan Dunn boarding in Hokkaido, Japan in January of 2017. Photo courtesy of SnowSearch.

of multi-passes. One of the first such passes came from global mountain resort operator Vail Resorts, Inc. Their pass, called the “Epic Pass,” functions quite differently from past single resort options. Dunn says, “Instead of buying access to one mountain, [with the Epic Pass] you bought a season pass to all mountains, and you could go to as many of them as you want as much as you like.” Vail’s Epic Pass has proved incredibly successful. Other multi-resort passes are now available on the market as a result. “If you’re someone who skis more than a few times a year, it suddenly makes sense to buy into one of these multi-passes,” Dunn adds.

SnowSearch co-founder Bryan Dunn boarding off Wyoming’s Teton Pass in September of 2017. Photo courtesy of SnowSearch.

Such desire for exploration inherent in the success of multi-passes shows in Dunn’s own habits, boarding in resorts on four continents. His experience making these trips and going through the frustrations of not only planning which resort to go to, but also where to rent any needed gear, what type of overnight space to stay in, and how to manage transportation from said space to the resort, is what inspired the website.

“We’ve always looked for some unbiased, trusted viewpoint and we’ve found that really difficult to capture. And alongside that, these multi-passes are great, but they only include lift tickets. You’re always going to purchase a hotel or a vacation rental — whether that’s a home rental, Airbnb, something else; sometimes you need gear rental; sometimes you need transportation,” says Dunn. “There’s all these disparate pieces of inventory that you need to purchase when you finally do figure out where you want to go and when, and all these things are all over the place on the web.”

Bryan Dunn and Luke Zirngibl’s RV which they used to drive across country from Boston to Utah. Photo courtesy of SnowSearch.

A business-minded individual himself, it was the combination of Dunn’s project pitching and the more technical-minded Zirngibl’s insights and skills that made SnowSearch, which aims to answer these problems, possible.

SnowSearch.co offers convenience at levels other ski websites have only brushed up against. From the start, the site is bursting with information. Current snowfall amounts for a variety of ski resorts scrolls across the top of the screen. Stories by local skiers and snowboarders, that know the resorts they cover, line the left-hand column. A map featuring nearby resorts lines the right.

The main feature of the site — the ability to simultaneously search for resort passes, gear rentals, and lodging — sits just below the scrolling snowfall information, right next to the SnowSearch logo.

Resort detail on SnowSearch.co. Photo courtesy of SnowSearch.

Type in a resort, choose a date range, select the number of people you’re looking to plan for, checkmark what other components you need to arrange, click “Deals,” and you’re matched with relevant information you would normally have to use multiple tabs for, all ready for you on one site. Dunn and Zirngibl see this as the only logical future for ski and snowboard planning. “We wanted to create one centralized environment where you can both find good trusted information based off what matters to you most, whether that’s where the most snow’s coming, or which resorts are nearby on your pass, or who has the best music, or ski party on the books for the next couple of weeks, and then book whatever you need for that trip,” Dunn says.

He adds, “We believe the industry needs something like this. It’s very sophisticated from an operational perspective, very sophisticated from a back-end tech perspective, but if you look at consumer-facing tech it’s super old-school, which has always worked just well enough,” he says. “As demographics start to shift, we’re confident we can provide a better channel for the industry to reach younger generations, who will represent the majority of spend within a few years. We’re eager to open up our platform to legacy stakeholders with the vision that the more comprehensive our site is from both an information and inventory perspective — as SnowSearch grows into a metasearch for the broader snow sports space — the better we can position the industry as a whole to engage the future consumers of these amazing sports.”

c.koldewyn@wasatchmag.com 

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Take Your Running to the Hills

Concrete grids and treadmills may rule the winter months, but it’s spring and it’s time to hit the trails. Fresh air in your lungs, ups and downs, winding paths, and scenic views atop mountains — these are the moments runners live for. Convenience and flat terrain attract runners to the roads, but nothing compares to an escape to fields of pine boughs and wildflowers in Salt Lake’s foothills.

Joey Campanelli, a local trail runner, lives for those sights. The first time I saw him, I was skiing down a run at Alta. I saw a flash of florescent pink and turned to identify the shorts over leopard leggings running up the ski slope. Soon, I saw his big, goofy grin. Campenelli wasn’t going to let snow deny him his passion for trail running. He used it as a tool to train harder. In his books, trail running is the only way to run. The freedom, the peace and quiet, and the beauty are hard to beat.

“The trails take you to the most amazing places,” he said. “You also meet a lot of cool people if you do it enough.”

It’s easy to lose touch with the natural beauty of the world when you’re accustomed to staring at a sunrise in Yosemite National Park on a computer monitor. Escape the chaos of city life and burn off the stress and strains of the day by running in the hills.

Trail running offers a mix of challenges: one moment you’re running uphill with your heart pounding and the next you have time to relax after you crest the peak and jog along a stream. But this isn’t a bad thing. In fact, variation means a wide range of muscles get exercise. You can also be distracted by the beautiful scenery and stimulated by what’s around the next bend.

Strap on some running shoes and hit the trail. The Bonneville Shoreline Trail along the Salt Lake foothills and Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon are great for beginners. *Warning* Trail running can be highly addictive and make you want to sign up for a race — so here’s a list for you:

 

April 29, Amasa Trail Runs, 15.5M, 9.5M, 6.5M, Moab, Utah

June 3, Vigor Solitude Trail Series Races, 13.1M, 8M, 5M, 3M, Cottonwood Heights, Utah

June 10, Park City Trail series 5K, Park City, Utah

June 17, Wasatch Steeplechase 17M, Salt Lake City, Utah

s.guirguis@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Carolyn Webber

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Guide to Discount Ski Tickets

Living along the Wasatch during the winter season can feel particularly incapacitating.The typically accessible trails are covered in a thick snowpack, requiring high levels of technicality, resources, and devotion. For most, the only recourse from the inversion and languid indoor blues is adrenaline-pumping immersion in Utah’s trademark “Greatest Snow on Earth” atop a pair of skis or snowboard. Unfortunately, the average student shredder can hardly afford to sustain themselves, let alone expend much-needed cash on absurdly expensive ski passes. Not to worry—we here at Wasatch care about your happiness and strained income, and this week we share with you some screamin’ deals to get you on the slopes without breaking the bank.

The Any-Day Discount Pass Approach—Discount Vouchers in the Valley

If you have the extra money and are compelled to go where you want, when you want, evade full price passes by visiting one of the many savvy outlets. On-campus folks in a rush can stop by the Student Union services desk and purchase tickets at a slight discount (really, only about $5).

Discount tickets can also be found at Lift House, Canyon Sports, REI, Salty Peaks, Sports Authority, Milo Sports, Sid’s Sports, Wasatch Ski Connection, Ski-N-See, Harmon’s grocery stores, Canyon Sports, and AJ Motion Sports.

Pro-tip: Passes tend to be significantly less expensive if bought in bulk—a good option if you intend to ski multiple times, though not enough to justify purchasing a season pass.

Or, if you prefer surfing for discount passes at home, check out these online resources:

  • Liftopia.com
  • Ksl.com
  • Groupon.com
  • Uofuonelove.com
  • freeskiersociety.com

As Good as it Gets: Specialty Promotions and Circumstantial Offers

Browsing many of the options listed above, you may think to yourself, “Wow! Lift tickets are still super expensive!” And you would be right! For those of us with more modest budgets, a couple of our local resorts offer specialty promotions that, if properly seized, can be an astoundingly inexpensive way to hit the slopes:

Powder Mountain:

  • College Days:  $27 – Every Wednesday and Thursday. Must present current student ID.
  • College Night: $15 – Every Thursday night, with student ID.
  • She Shreds Ladies Night: $15 for women every Wednesday night.
  • Family Night: 6 tickets for $65 every Tuesday night. (Your “family” can be brothers from other mothers, and sisters from other misters.)

Brighton:

Unfortunately, Brighton is pretty stringent with standard day passes, though they do offer several awesome deals for night skiing (usually $45 regular rate)!

  • Monday: Family Snow Evening – $99 for a family or group of 4 or less. Includes lift tickets and a 24″ pizza from the Alpine Rose.
  • Wednesday: Buy a combo meal at participating Arctic Circle Restaurants and receive a buy one get one free night skiing voucher.
  • Thursday: Snow Sports School Thursday Night Lessons; Get a two-hour lesson + a night lift ticket for $50.

Best of luck out there, savvy skiers.

D.rees@wasatchmag.com

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Spend the holidays outdoors

It’s the most wonderful time of year, and what could be more wonderful than spending it the great outdoors? Whether you’re looking for an escape from the crowds of Christmas shoppers in the backcountry or join them singing carols on the slopes, we’ve got a few options for you.

Santa and Sunsets at Deer Valley

The man with the cherry red nose andeight reindeer will make a special appearance at Deer Valley on Dec. 24, for photos and wish lists at the Snow Park Lodge area in the morning and Silver Lake Lodge area until 1:30 p.m. There will be a sunset ski down the Homeward Bound run on Bald Mountain from the Sterling Express lift.

Snowbird Traditions

Throughout December, Snowbird is popping with holiday traditions. From Dec. 6-13 Hanukkah candle lighting will take place every night at sundown. On Dec. 18 and 19, there will be a Torchlight Parade and fireworks as well as a ceremony on the Plaza Deck in remembrance of Dick Bass, the former owner of Snowbird Ski resort and also a man who summited the seven peaks. A tree lighting ceremony in honor of veterans will also take place on Dec 19. Christmas Eve will be filled with skiing Santas, as the first 100 Santas enter for free. There will be another Torchlight Parade followed by fireworks, a candlelight service, and Christmas Eve dinner prepared by Snowbird’s finest dining from 5-10 p.m. for those who join. On Christmas, Mr. and Mrs. Claus will ride the ‘Bird and attend a Christmas dinner.

Stay in a Yurt

Adventure like the nomads, go off the grid for a few days and enjoy a getaway with your family in a cozy yurt for the holidays. A yurt is a circular tent made up of thick skins or other various materials that has a collapsible frame. These were once used by nomads in Siberia, Mongolia, and Turkey. They are available all over the Wasatch, but the top rated ones are in Goblin Valley, Blue Sky Antelope, and Castle Peak. Yurts are an ideal way to escape the distractions of the world and enjoy a peaceful time with family and friends this holiday.

m.mensinger@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Carolyn Webber

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