Fall

Dream jobs for the outdoor enthusiast

The dream job for most outdoor enthusiasts = spending a good amount of time outdoors and with like-minded people. Oh, and free gear.

Welcome to the lives of those working in the outdoor industry. Yes, it’s just as good as you’ve always imagined. How do you land a job like that? Workers at three outdoor retailers tell us:

Mark Cole, a business and sales executive at HippyTree Surf & Stone Apparel, graduated with a BA of social ecology from UC Irvine.

Jess Smith, vice president of Outside PR (which represents Cotopaxi), majored in communication at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia.

Robert Shirley-Smith (see image above), sales director at Tentsile, studied human geography and anthropology at Sussex University in England.

Do you feel that your education applies to your current work?

Cole: I want to say yes because I’m a big fan of higher education, but truthfully, probably not. This type of industry and these type of jobs require a lot of on-the-job-training.

Smith: Absolutely. 100 percent. It just sets you up in terms of who you are as a person, what you like to do, and how to utilize your skills and talents the best.

Shirley-Smith: No crossover whatsoever. When I graduated in 2010 during the economic slump, there were no jobs available so I retrained as a carpenter. The founder of Tentsile reached out to me originally because of my experience with treehouses; that was involved in his goal of creating a tent that would fit all trees.

Did you always know you wanted to work with an outdoor company?

 Cole: I kind of figured it out when I was about 17 or 18 when I saw people older than myself living a pretty sweet lifestyle and told myself, ‘If they can make money doing that, I don’t see why I can’t.’

Shirley-Smith: No—I didn’t even know this industry existed back in England! My real passion was for building. But I just rolled with the punches and ended up here.

What is your favorite aspect of your work?

 Cole: I like that this industry is fun and it can be pretty irreverent at times. There’s a whole lot of lines that get crossed on a pretty regular basis and I can’t say that it shares that with a lot of other industries. It’s unique in that way.

Shirley-Smith: I respect the business’s ethics; it supports reforestation and sustainability, which aligns with my own values.

What is your all-time favorite piece of equipment or gear?

 Smith: I’m really drawn to Cotopaxi’s Kusa line of products with llama fleece and poly-insulation products. It’s helping to assist a lot of Bolivian communities because they’re working with farmers and the agricultural production there. Nobody else is doing llama. And the items look great, too.

Shirley-Smith: The Connect Model Tensile. After I survived an 11-hour rainstorm in it, I bonded with it.

Do you have an outdoor tip to share with fellow enthusiasts?

 Cole: Don’t be afraid to push your limits, but always stay within your comfort zone and be prepared.

Smith: Layer up. Always have a Buff on hand. Buff is the most versatile piece of equipment you are going to have for any sport.

What is your favorite aspect of the outdoors?

 Cole: It’s kind of like church for me personally. You are able to connect with nature on a deeper level when you step outside your comfort zone and experience new things and kind of see the raw splendor of Mother Nature.

Shirley-Smith: I grew up in the city in London, where the outdoors are viewed more as an escape from an urban environment than in other areas. So that is initially how I learned to love the outdoors, as an escape. It also helped that my parents were hippies and roamed the country with me in a van.

c.simon@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Claire Simon

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Discover a Warm and Groovy Place for a Soak in Monroe

One thing to know about me: I hate being cold. I absolutely loathe it. If I could be wrapped in a heated blanket all through winter I wouldn’t object. Unfortunately, this is not an option, so instead of becoming a hermit all winter long I’ve found that visiting one of the many hot springs in Utah is a much better way to stay warm and have fun.

When I moved here from Pennsylvania five years ago I was determined to take advantage of as many hot springs as I could. One of my favorite springs in Utah, and one that I love returning to, is Mystic Hot Springs in Monroe.

The first thing that sets Mystic apart from other hot springs is its accommodations. Along with tent camping spots and cabins, the resort has some very funky, and very cool, vintage converted buses to spend the night in. Each bus is different; some are set up with bunks to be party buses, and others are cozy for two.

My boyfriend and I stayed in the Ripple bus and spent most of the day soaking, napping, and eating. Mystic is a well-kept secret. It’s never ridiculously crowded and there are so many different pools you never have to wait around to get a tub all to yourself.

The heart of this small town feels like a bubble of calm. There are no loud noises or lights to intrude on the tranquility of the campsite. There’s nothing better than getting into a hot pool at 12 a.m. after relaxing by the fire after dinner. Above, the stars shine brightly due to the lack of light pollution.

It’s not a typical resort with fresh towels and room service, but for what it lacks in modern amenities, it makes up for in atmosphere. The resort has been around for a long time, and when “Mystic Mike” Ginsburg purchased the place back in 1996, he was able to keep the 70’s charm of the resort despite new cabin builds and renovations.

Mystic Hot Springs attracts a diverse group of outdoorsmen and women. It’s a place that invites musicians, artists, story-tellers, hippies, and soul searchers to come and relax. The owners leave personal touches such as chocolate mints, incense, and handwritten welcome letters for each new guest. It’s little things like this that make visiting Mystic worth the drive every time.

 

e.aboussou@wasatchmag.com

Photos by Esther Aboussou

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The Mountaineering Opthamologist, Doctor Geoff Tabin

I pulled out my phone to investigate what was responsible for the buzzing in my pocket and saw a number I’d never seen before calling from Salt Lake. It was Dr. Geoffrey Tabin, returning my call for an interview. Within just a few minutes, I found myself deep into a conversation about one of my favorite climbing spots near my home in Chicago.

I could hardly believe it. Here was a man who was one of the early few to climb all seven summits (completed in June 1990), was part of the bravely harebrained group that invented bungee jumping, and has a seemingly biblical power to cure the blind — and he was talking to me about good ol’ Devil’s Lake in Baraboo, Wisconsin.

In an attempt to steer the conversation back on track I asked how it is that such a decorated alpinist/adventurer gets involved in cataract surgery. What followed is a conversation I am likely never to forget, one that I will do my best to immortalize here.

Tabin, known simply as Geoff in those days, graduated with an MA in Philosophy from Oxford University on a Marshall Scholarship. During his time there he took full advantage of “Indigenous trust funds,” which were remnants leftover from the days when Oxford encouraged their students too go out into the world and “civilize” it. To Tabin, these were his tickets atop some of the world’s most impressive mountains. Through these funds, Tabin traveled far and wide, climbing to his heart’s content.

One such trip was to New Guinea, where his friend David Kirke from the Oxford Dangerous Sport Club, a group of a few dozen extreme sport athletes who pioneered the most absurd challenges imaginable, encouraged him to try the native rite of passage known as vine jumping.

Although Kirke was wrong about vine jumping starting in New Guinea, it actually began in the nearby island of Vanuatu, the club was inspired. They decided to urbanize the native challenge. Using bungees from an aircraft carrier, Tabin and colleagues sent a lucky (or perhaps foolhardy) few over the edge of the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, England.

The jump and subsequent bungee parts were a wild success, however, the heavy, slick cords made it impossible to hoist the rider back onto the bridge. There the rider dangled, long enough for a local paper to snap some pictures. Soon, stories of the absurd stunt traveled far and wide, all the way across the Atlantic to an American TV show called “That’s Incredible.” They requested the club come out to Colorado and recreate the stunt, but Tabin recalls his pals’ resistance. “They said there was no sport in it,”  Tabin recounts with a chuckle. “They had proven it could be done so to them the sport was gone.”

Regardless, the club set out to the United States and performed the first ever televised bungee jump off the Royal Gorge Bridge in Colorado. After, they packed up their bungees and headed to the Bonneville Salt Flats. If there was no sport left in bungee jumping, they decided they better do something worthwhile in America. Catapulting themselves between two cars, they managed to get a wheelchair (and rider) up to over 60 miles an hour, a new world record.

Primarily a mountaineer, most of Tabin’s trips took place in the Himalayas. Perhaps his most historic trip was his ascent of the last unclimbed section of Everest, the Kangshung Face. It took three attempts before Tabin himself finally stood atop the infamous East Face in 1988. Although he wasn’t the first to do so, he was on the mountain supporting the 1983 crew that managed to ascend the face for the first time. It is considered to be one of the most difficult routes up the mountain and is rarely attempted.

80s Nepal, the foremost climbing country in the Himalayas, was not much better off than most third-world countries. It was here, in the disheartening villages, that Tabin realized his passion for, “the moral, philosophical underpinnings of healthcare.” He witnessed a cataract surgery on a woman during one of his Everest expeditions and was amazed at the power it had to transform her life.

Returning to the U.S. to attend medical school at Harvard University, Tabin realized he wanted to return to Nepal, only this time it wasn’t to climb. It was on this return trip that he met Dr. Sanduk Ruit, a leading cataract surgeon from Nepal working on a pioneering surgery.

With Ruit’s new method, surgeries became cheaper, faster, and simpler than ever. Using a small incision, Ruit was able to clean away the buildup causing the cataract and install a secondary lens to refocus the vision. Tabin was convinced this was his calling. With Ruit, Tabin started the Himalayan Cataract Project.

The project’s goal was to help combat blindness in Nepal alone — a goal soon surpassed. Under the two men’s guidance, a multitude of different training programs for adults or youth were implemented in Nepal. Within a few years the Project had treated  nearly 300,000 people in Nepal. Looking back, Tabin realized that naming his organization the Himalayan Cataract Project was a mistake.

“At the time, the need in Nepal was so great, some 255,000 people were backlogged for these surgeries. We saw this as a life endeavor” Tabin recalls. With serious dedication and effort, however, the project has spread far across Nepalese borders. The Himalayan Cataract Project now works not just in other Himalayan countries like Tibet, but all over Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa too.

Today, Tabin’s life is still packed with adventure, although of a different kind than in his college days. Instead of jumping off bridges or climbing big mountains, he is traveling a large part of the year doing the work he loves in the most disparaged countries. He doesn’t have much time for big expeditions anymore which is why he loves living in Utah. “You can skin up a mountain, ski down, and still be at work by 8 a.m.”

But he does manage to find a few days here and there for some larger trips. A few years ago in Africa he was able to sneak off for six days to casually climb Kilimanjaro with a paraplegic veteran, an expedition that sums up his character.

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

Photos courtesy of Geoffrey Tabin

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How To: Purify Water

The most appealing aspect of backpacking is undoubtedly the remoteness. Few things are better than entertaining the fantasy that you are the first person to trot down that lonely dirt trail in a very long time. The last thing you want is for your range to be limited, and one of the most limiting factors is water.

The sticker about water is that it’s heavy, very heavy. Trying to pack around all your water for a week’s trip is absurd. You’ll find a broken back and dehydration before the remote peace and solitude you set out for. This means that gathering water as you go is your only option, and to do this safely you need to purify it. Fortunately, there are more than a few ways to do this.

The age-old tactic is boiling. Once water hits the magical 100° C (212° F) mark, it will begin to boil. It is at this temperature that all the nasty microbes that would result in a week in the outhouse are killed off, and the water becomes safe to drink. At higher elevations water boils at a lower temperature. There’s a whole bunch of technical, sciency stuff behind this, but the gist of it is that less atmospheric pressure means less energy to boil the water, and less energy means less heat. In order to ensure all those microbes are dead, you should boil water for longer at higher altitudes.

This tactic works very well in the winter. Grab some ice, or snow if no ice is available, and melt it down. You have a warm, safe drink ready to go. In the summer, this is the opposite of what you want. Why take that nice cool stream water and heat it up when it’s already baking hot outside? Boiling also requires some kind of stove. Although there are lightweight cook systems out there, they all are heavier than most of the other purifying techniques.

The next most common practice is using a pump purifier. This is a reliable, long-lasting method of combating dehydration. Essentially, a small tube extends into the water source and sucks water up into a big filter and then spits it out, all clean and pure, through another tube into your water bottle. You are safe to drink that water immediately and it will be as cold as the source you pulled it from. However, pumping enough water for several liters quickly becomes tedious and tiring and the pump itself still weighs a decent amount.

The last solution, and my personal favorite, is a chemical purifier. These come in the form of iodine drops or chlorine tablets. They are specially sold at outdoor retailers for purifying water and have explicit instructions on how to use them. Do not buy a bag of chlorine and start DIY purifying your water. You will be DIY poisoning yourself. These purifiers are lightweight, easy to use, and require very minimal effort. However, they do take time to work. You will not be able to drink your water immediately after adding it so some forward thinking is required.
Whatever your trip, don’t be limited by water. There is more than enough H2O spilling around the backcountry for you to take advantage of.   

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

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Quit trashing our public lands

In 2016, there was an abundance of news stories about visitors defacing national parks by painting, spraying, and carving on monuments and structures. Many of the culprits have unwittingly called attention to themselves by posting their “art” on social media. In June of this year, Casey Nocket was banned from all National Parks and 524 million acres of public lands after she posted pictures of her graffiti on Instagram.

Actress Vanessa Hudgens carved her and her boyfriend’s name with a heart at a national forest in Arizona. After posting a picture on Instagram, she was caught by fans and faced a $1,000 fine. Public shaming of these individuals has hopefully dissuaded others from taking up the hobby of graffitiing public lands. However, while pointing fingers some may also be defacing the land in a different way. All too often, hikers and campers leave their trash behind, and these culprits are much harder to find.

As an avid camper, I don’t think I could count all of the campsites I’ve been to that included a pile of garbage. I’ve seen everything from beer bottles and snack packaging to used condoms and clothing. Utah has such a beautiful landscape, but stumbling upon used paper plates or an old, torn-up t-shirt ruins the aesthetics of the great outdoors.

It’s not just about looks; trash and debris also affect wildlife. Many animals are lured out of their homes  by the scent of campfire leftovers, putting them in harm’s way. Some food is not safe for animals to consume, and smaller rodents can get trapped inside containers or bottles left behind. Many animals confuse packaging for food and inadvertently poison themselves. Debris left near rivers and streams cause build-ups and leave residue that could be toxic to aquatic animals. In Utah, littering is currently considered a Class B misdemeanor and carries a $100 fine.

For as many state and national parks that Utah has, there is a comparable number of primitive campsites run by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that are free and accessible to the public.  The BLM manages over 245 million acres of public lands each year, and even with around 10,000 employees, it’s a lot of ground to cover.

Littering is a huge problem, but there are several ways to fight it. The first step is to take personal action. If you’re a hiker, carry a small plastic bag with you to pick-up litter. Campers should pack out their litter and take advantage of the trashcans that are available at most campsites. Use switchbacks and drive on designated roads. Call someone out (with respect, please) if you see them carving into a tree or dropping a stray candy wrapper on the ground. Every little bit helps.

The BLM and other organizations are always looking for volunteers to clean up the outdoors. The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics initiative is a nationwide organization takes volunteers to clean up hiking trails and campsites.

It’s important to remember that, even if we donate or pay entrance fees to access parks, when we travel deep into the great outdoors we are guests, and we should behave like the visitors we are.

e.aboussou@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Kiffer Creveling

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How to: Hike With Your Pup in the Wasatch

If you enjoy immersing yourself in nature, odds are your dog does too. With four points of contact to the rocky soil and an instinctual connection to all things outside, your dog is a much more effective hiking buddy than you may think. This week, we share with you some helpful guidelines for experiencing nature with your pup safely and responsibly, as well as some opportune, and prohibited, places to embark.

Pack for Two: Dogs exert a great deal of energy while climbing a mountain, and they need plenty of food and water in compensation. Pack double water and enough treats for a subsequent snacks — especially on longer hikes. Rather than relying on your cupped hands or the tiny lid of a water bottle, bring a drinking bowl, ideally a durable one that won’t break in your pack or against a rock.

Be Conscious of Location: While the four-legged form is exceptionally well-equipped for steep and rocky terrain, it’s best to avoid anything too technical, lest you overwhelm or potentially endanger your furry companion. Smaller peaks and regular trails are fine, just avoid anything with serious scrambling or exposure. Many places are explicitly prohibited to dogs- more on that below.

Be Respectful: Be respectful and conscious when in the alpine. Regardless of how warm, kind, and obedient you think your doggy is, bring along a leash in any circumstances, one never knows how their dog will react to certain stimuli and personalities in nature. Bring along a few baggies to collect your dog’s sporatic waste. Yes, it’s gross, but you should carry a larger bag for trash anyway — you won’t even notice a bit of extra, contained cargo.

Also — and this one is important — be sure that your furry friend is in good health and up to the task. Last summer I had to carry Rosco (the smiling border collie above) down two plus miles of hiking trail on the account of an injured dewclaw that I had thought wouldn’t be a problem that day.

Where to Go: A Few of My Favorites and Permitted Areas
Grandeur Peak and Mount Wire are very close to campus and great for both humans and dogs — really, most trails along the foothills, smaller mountains, and Bonneville Shoreline Trail are exceptional.
Neff’s Canyon
East Canyon
Mount Olympus Trail — a bit of technical scrambling after saddle though virtually no exposure.
Mill creek Canyon — a multitude of great dog hikes, off-leash permitted on odd days.

Permanent Prohibitions: No Dogs Allowed, Watershed Areas
Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons
Parleys, Dell, and Lambs Canyons
I strongly recommend not marching your dog up any of the Wasatch’s 11,000ers, even those outside of watershed areas.

d.rees@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Dalton Rees

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What Kind of Adventurer Are You?

Author of “Desert Solitaire,” Edward Abbey, says there are three types of adventurers: Desert Rats, Mountain People, and People of the Sea. If you’ve ever wondered what type of Adventurer you are, answer these simple questions to find out. “Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread.”

You have the weekend off, what would you rather do?

A. Sail in the Great Salt Lake

B. Summit Mount Timpanogos

C. Climb sandstone pillars in Indian Creek in southern Utah

What motivates you?

A. Having a clear goal or set destination, and reaching it.

B. Being the first to reach my goals and making sure everyone knows it.

C. Having no set expectations, just enjoying the moment.

If you had a slogan, which would it be?

A. “If in doubt, paddle it out.”

B. “The mountains are calling and I must go.”

C. “Sand runs through my veins.”

If you had to be consumed by an animal, which would you choose?

A. Killer Whale

B. Grizzly Bear

C. Vulture

Who is your favorite poet or author?

A. Walt Whitman

B. Henry David Thoreau

C. Edward Abbey…duh.

What statement would you say best describes you in relationships?

A. My relationships are usually short lived, but my devotion is as deep as the ocean.

B. I enjoy company, but get cranky and need my space. I ultimately want to share my successes surrounded by people I love.

C. I need alone time and a lot of it.

Which of these smells turns you on?

A. Salty Breeze

B. Pine Needles

C. Sage Brush

If you answered mostly A, you are a Person of the Sea. People who know you may call you a Beach Bum, Sea Creature, mermaid or merman, or any other aquatic nickname. You tend to be wise and methodical in your decisions and a team player. For your next adventure, try floating the Great Salt Lake or rafting down the Green River.

If you answered mostly B, you are a bonafide “mountain man/woman”. You are brave outgoing and daring. You live for the moments where you can stand on top of the world where few others have stood. Take a weekend trip to Rocky Mountain National Park or hike any of our beautiful trails on the Wasatch mountain range. Try hiking up to Bell’s Canyon or Lone Peak on your next adventure.

If you answered mostly C, you are a Desert Rat. Congrats, Edward Abbey would be proud. You are now an honorary member of the Monkey Wrench gang. Well, maybe not. You enjoy challenges and being outside your comfort zone. You see beauty where others don’t. For your next trip, try backpacking in Moab or near Grand Staircase National Monument.

a.winter@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Carolyn Webber

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Fat Tires Expand — Mountain Biking Season

Ah, winter. The most wonderful time of the year. Snow on the ground means the skis come out, the lifts start moving, and everyone is happy. Everyone, that is, except mountain bikers. For them, snow on the ground means the end of a season and the beginning of a long wait. Trying to run a trail with even a little of that white stuff on it can be disastrous. Fortunately, there is a solution, and it comes looking like the monster truck of mountain bikes. It is the fat bike.

At first glance these bikes seem pretty standard. Handlebars, check. Seat, check. Frame, check. Tires, woah. This is the central difference between and mountain bike and a fat bike. A typical mountain bike tire is about two to two-and-a-half inches wide. A fat bike tire is usually four or five. Any other major differences on the bike, like a wider frame and specialized braking system, basically just accommodate this extra width.

Clearly a more massive tire and heavier bike means you will not be going as fast as you would on a traditional bike, but that is not the purpose of a fat bike. The key factor provided by larger tires is accessibility, not speed. Wider tires mean more tire contact with the ground and more cushion. This allows the rider to gain better traction and “float” across terrain previously impassable.

Because of this unique ability, fat bikes were quickly nicknamed snow bikes. The big, grippy tires certainly help open up new realms of biking like high alpine riding, but fat bikes don’t have to just sit in your garage all summer.

Any terrain that is either too rough or too slippery for a traditional bike is perfect for a fat bike. Be it rock gardens, flooded trails, hard packed snow, or fresh powder, the fat bike takes it all with ease. Improvements in frame design and material have transitioned the once touring specific beast into something that can now be used as a replacement to your traditional bike in many cases.

The best example of this is the introduction of suspension. Early fat bikes were locked solid, and although beefier tires slightly offset the bumps, it was not nearly enough. Now, however, front or double suspension bikes are available to the masses for a hefty, but not insurmountable, price. If you are willing to invest three to five grand for a new, shiny dual suspension fat bike, you’ll open yourself up to a whole new variety of trails.

The Iditarod Trail Invitational was the original jumping point for fat bikes. Every year, one week before the sled dog Iditarod, skiers, trail runners, and bikers are invited to tackle the 1,000 mile trail. Although it had been done on traditional bikes before, it was not easy. At least half the time the snow made the trail impassable, forcing riders to drag their bikes. The large tires of the fat bike, however, can handle the trail with grace, and is now the standard.

If you’re not quite up for a thousand mile battle across Alaska just yet, there are still ways to get out and enjoy your fat bike. For the more competitive, there is Frosty’s Fat Bike Race Series, a nine to twelve mile snow race that takes place in January on the Wasatch front. The more relaxed adventurer can rent a fat bike from Outdoor Adventures for $30 a day ($60 for a weekend) and hit up either Guardsman Pass or the Bonneville Shoreline trail for some cool winter views.

Although the tires may seem comically large, the fat bike is one of the best ways to get out and explore. Any terrain in its path will likely be conquered. No more will a ride be riddled by annoying stop-and-carry spots and no more will mountain bikers dread the day snow falls for the first time. Thanks to the fat bike, winter really is the most wonderful time of the year again.

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Gessie Eaton

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CampingFallSummer

Watch: Wasatch crew camps near Strawberry River

The Wasatch team got together for a camping trip at the Strawberry River near Heber. Watch the fun!

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A Tinfoil Thanksgiving: Four of our Favorite Recipes

Near-naked trees and chilling temps can only mean one thing: ‘tis the season to load up on food and shrug off your guilt. The United States has even dedicated a holiday for you to stuff your belly and build up extra “layers” for the winter months. However, Thanksgiving suggests a four-day weekend, which tempts many outdoor adventurists to ditch family dinners and escape into nature. Lucky for you, we’ve found ways to bring Thanksgiving to the wilderness, so you can binge eat and give thanks for this beautiful world while being surrounded by it.

THANKSGIVING HOBO DINNER

10 turkey cutlets

2 cans of gravy

1 bag of frozen green beans and carrots

1 package of cranberries

Pour an inch-layer of gravy on the bottom. Place the turkey cutlet on top. Sprinkle frozen green beans and carrots over the turkey. Top with more gravy and a handful of cranberries. Wrap up and place in the fire. Repeat.

Cook time: 20 minutes

Tip: Don’t use all the gravy in food prep. You’ll want some to pour over after the meal is cooked.

POTATOES AU TINFOIL

1 can of cream of chicken/mushroom soup

2 lbs. of small yellow potatoes

1 onion

1 bag of shredded cheese

Salt and pepper

Spread a layer of soup on the bottom. Cut the potatoes into thin slices and place 3-4 potatoes, worth on top. Slice onion and add. Add salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle a handful of cheese, seal, and place in fire. Repeat.

Cook time: 30 minutes

Tip: Potatoes often take the longest to cook, but the thinner you cut them, the quicker they soften.

Photo by Chris Hammock

Photo by Chris Hammock

MOM’S SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE

3 medium-sized sweet potatoes

1 cup of brown sugar

2 tablespoons of butter

1 cup of marshmallows

4 sheets of graham crackers

Chocolate bars (optional)

Dice the sweet potatoes and toss onto the tinfoil with cubed butter and brown sugar. Wrap up and place in the fire. After you pull the food out, open and place marshmallows, graham crackers and, if desired, chocolate, onto the steaming potatoes.

Cook time: 20 minutes

Tip: Try to keep the brown sugar toward the center of the potatoes or it will quickly burn.

APPLE PIE-IN-A-HOLE

6 apples

1 cup of brown sugar

2 tablespoons of butter

¾ cup of rolled oats

Cinnamon

Cut the core out of the apple. Dice butter and place a few cubes inside the hole, along with brown sugar, cinnamon, and rolled oats. Wrap in tinfoil and toss in the fire.

Cook time: 15 minutes

Almost all of these recipes received thumbs up and smiles from the Wasatch crew on a staff camping trip. Enjoy!

c.webber@dailyutahchronicle.com

@carolyn_webber

Feature photo by Kiffer Creveling

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