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Gear

Bomber and Company: More Flashy than Functional

I stray far from the frivolous. Every item I purchase, or think about purchasing, is weighed against the possible experiences I could have for the same cost. Spending $50 to replace the rain jacket I lost last October? No thanks. I’d rather swing by Walmart and grab a dollar poncho before heading up into the Uintas for an overnight backpacking trip.

Needless to say, when Bomber and Company’s package showed up in the mail for us to review here at Wasatch Magazine, I was skeptical. At first glance, these seemed frivolous. I was, we’ll say, half wrong.

In the neatly packed box were five items: the Bomber Barrel (duffel bag), the Mini Bomber Travel Kit (amenities bag), the B-2 Nano Blade (truly tiny pocket knife), Bomber Carabiner Paracord Keychain (exactly what it says), and the Bomber Firestarter Paracord Bracelet (bracelet of woven paracord with firestarter flint). At first sight, all these products absolutely nailed one main factor: design. Everything was sleek, black, and modern, from the cleanly woven paracord zipper pulls on the duffel to the tactical shape of the “world’s smallest pocket knife.” The whole lot was a solid mix of tactical survival with modern, everyday city life. Anyone carrying these items would certainly give off the outdoorsy, bad-to-the-bone, Bear Grylls-esque, “I survived behind enemy lines for three days eating only cactus,” impression.

However, from a first impression, I suspected this is where the products would end. The actual utility of these items seemed like an afterthought. That didn’t sit well with me, so I decided to use these pieces of trendy gear like they were advertised. I ended up with mixed results.

The duffel is easy to rate. It paired with the travel kit to make for a very useful bit of luggage. I toted it along on a weekend backpacking trip to Zion National Park’s Kolob Canyon and found that it served perfectly as my “doesn’t belong in the backpack” bag. That is, the bag with all my snacks, books, chargers, etc., that would not be accompanying me on the trail. I found the bag to be a good, medium size with a simple number of pockets, just enough to hold all your small bits without acting like a puzzle when you have to get something out.

The two paracord items, the bracelet and keychain, also proved at least functional. They clearly were still created for form over function, though, they did still function. The firestarters on both worked (after scraping off the black coating). I found that by wrapping the keychain around your knuckle and using the separate circular striker, you can throw decent sparks off the flint and steel. Of course, if your fire-making skills aren’t already pretty solid, it won’t be of much use.

The B-2 Nano Blade, on the other hand, I found frivolous. I saw no use the tiny pocket knife could provide that a much cheaper Swiss Army knife couldn’t. At least you get a toothpick with the Swiss Army. It only seems useful if you want to feel like a marine while opening your envelopes.

The major downside of all these products ties into their biggest positive. They are all far too expensive. The duffel catches a cool $200, while the paracord products each hit the $23 mark. The hopelessly small pocketknife asks a steep $35. To me, this only reinforces that these products were made for looks, not necessarily use. They aren’t bad, but paying that much for an extraneous piece of gear isn’t something I’m chomping at the bit for. These are targeted towards consumers who are trying to put on a facade and don’t mind paying a little bit more for it. For that market, they’re doing great.

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

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Is GoPro’s Value Justified? (The answer may surprise you)

Contributor submission from Tom Gerber. 

Action cameras don’t come more intelligent than GoPros. And with this technology comes a hefty price tag. GoPro’s CEO Nick Woodman once remarked that “GoPro is not just a camera company anymore.” Following this statement, not too long ago GoPro joined the drone space by unveiling a drone of their own named the Karma drone.

The drone hasn’t had a smooth sail, prompting a recall, though hope is not lost as it’s set for a relaunch later this year.

Promising Start

Three years ago, GoPro was the darling IPO (Initial Public Offering, or the first time a company puts it stock on the market) launching with an initial offering price of $24. At the time, the company was valued at $5.3 billion. This is not a meek valuation by any standards, even though the numbers said otherwise (a look at the 1st quarter of 2013 vis-à-vis 2014’s showed a fall in revenue by $20 million from $255 to $235 million).

The company explained the difference by saying that the delayed unveiling of its Hero3 camera in late 2012 translated to its sales being experienced more in early 2013, hence the larger figures in the first quarter of 2013.

Diminishing Valuation

Four years down the line, what does the valuation look like for GoPro? Well, it looks bleaker and the numbers speak volumes. 2016 was the year that saw the company cut down jobs and any ambitious endeavors in order to save its flagging sales.

But even after that, their forecast for the first quarter of 2017 is disappointing with the company announcing that it would generate at least $60 million less than analysts projected they would generate. Industry analysts projected $270 million in revenue as opposed to the figure of $210 million that the company now says is the expected revenue.

With such a rough start to the year, are there results to justify the valuation of GoPro?

The company already announced record quarterly revenue for the APAC and EMEA region and also experienced a 30% increase in installs of the Quik Mobile App in 4Q16. In addition, the Hero5 black was the best selling digital imaging device locally in the US and in the EMEA market as well.

However, apart from the Karma drone that is to be launched later this year after being recalled due to a problem with losing power mid-flight—according to Ben Popper from The Verge the problem with Karma was “a mechanical issue related to securing the drone’s battery”—the company is still struggling to get back on its feet and solve this issue.

Bleak Prospects in 2017

Photo credit to Tom Gerber.

Shares have been down and the company cannot meet the forecasted revenue for the first quarter of 2017. Rising up from the ashes of such losses proves difficult year after year. The company was relying on the re-entry of the Karma drone and the new Hero5 camera to boost sales and enable it to meet it projected revenue. However, unforeseen delays undermined their efforts and this was not to be.

In truth, after having its shares peak at $93.85 in 2014, GoPro is now at an all-time low. In fact, since 2015 the company’s shares have not been able to get over the $24 threshold. While this is not good for GoPro, it gives their competition cause for a good night sleep.

Companies like Sony, Gamin and Olympus have plugged the gap left by less demand for GoPro products with a vengeance. They are weighing in with low-budget alternatives that are similarly tech advanced but that cost less. These companies have borrowed heavily from the top features on GoPro products and attached a bargain friendly price tag.

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Guide to Salt Lake Paddleboarding

When most people hear the term “outdoor water recreation,” they automatically picture intense white water rafting or some other adrenaline pumping form of water sport. That’s only a portion of what the phrase entails.

If you’re looking for a casual, relaxing day at the lake, for example, you can find it through paddleboarding. Paddleboards are a great way to enjoy Utah’s beautiful lakes and reservoirs, and also allow you to incorporate other sports and hobbies. They work for rough water, too. There are two types of paddleboards: the SUP — or stand up paddleboard — and the traditional “prone,” or kneeling board.

While the prone paddleboards are mainly used for choppy, rough water, they are also perfect for the rapids of Utah’s rivers. Note: for first timers, I highly suggest signing up with a river guide before embarking on such a journey.

For those (like me) who just want to enjoy a day on the lake, a standard SUP is perfect. You can find plenty of rental shops that allow you to rent paddleboards, though it may cost you a little more than a college student can afford. This is where Outdoor Adventures, located at the University of Utah’s Student Life Center, can come in handy. Don’t forget your UCard for that student discount — with it, a SUP is only $25 a day. Since most rental shops charge $15-20 an hour by comparison, this is a significant money saver. Take advantage of what your tuition pays for.

 

When it comes to the actual process of renting from OA, it’s as easy as walking in and asking to rent anything they have to offer. Be aware though, SUPs are one of their most popular items, meaning that you should call ahead to reserve your board as early as 1-2 weeks before you want to use them.

OA carries two different SUPs: rigid and inflatable. I recommend the inflatable ones are because they come all nicely rolled up in a backpack that is fully equipped with an oar and pump for easy transportation. The rigid SUPs are 12-14 feet long, and they can be a little tricky to transport. The benefit to the rigid boards is that you don’t need to make reservations for them, and the OA staff are more than willing to help figure out a safe and easy way to tie it to your car.

Want to paddleboard but don’t know where to go? Utah has plenty of places to paddle around without a care in the world. While most lakes allow boats (and are designated motorized), there are some places that are specifically restricted for non-motorized water recreation. Below is a list of lakes and reservoirs that are easily accessible from Salt Lake County:

  • Causey Reservoir (Non-motorized)
  • Deer Creek (Motorized)
  • East Canyon (Motorized)
  • Pineview Reservoir (Motorized)
  • Jordanelle Reservoir (Motorized)
  • Willard Bay (Motorized)

a.duong@wasatchmag.com

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BikingFeatureGearHow to

Learning Proper Bicycle Maintenance

Maintaining a bike is similar to the practice of warming your body up for a big race with a proper cool down afterwards, or preparing for an important exam by regularly studying; and it all comes down to proper, regular inspection.

A bike gets a quick checkup. Photo by Peter Creveling.

There are four things to check before every ride you make, regardless of if you are a frequent visitor to your bike seat or someone who just decided to brush off the cobwebs of your grandparent’s Schwinn.

First: Check the air in your tires. Make sure the tire pressure is optimal as suggested by the manufacturer, and be sure to check that all release levers, tire caps, or thru axles are properly tightened. Be sure nothing is loose before you start to ride.

Second: Inspect your brakes. Squeeze both the front and rear brakes to ensure the pads engage your rims properly and evenly. Good breaks are essential, they can make the difference between having the ride of your life — and the last ride of your life.

Third: Clean your drivetrain. This is essentially the transmission of your bike, so a clean and well lubricated drivetrain will make your ride easier and extend the life of your bike. Take a dry, or damp, rag and run along the chain to clean up any dirt accumulated between the linkages. For very dirty chains, I highly recommend using a chain cleaner that allows for a deep clean between the linkages. These are very easy to use devices that latch onto the chain and are simple enough to use by holding the device in place while you peddle.

A bike gets a quick checkup. Photo by Peter Creveling.

Fourth: Keep all of the parts well lubricated. A well lubricated bike is the equivalent to doing a warm-up lap around the track and stretching before you run the 100 meter dash. Running cold turkey is asking for something to be torn, and the same thing goes for any bicycle! But remember, too much lubrication can lead to a decrease in bike performance, and even damages. This is because lubrication can attract abrasive material that can get in-between parts and decrease their integrity. Give lubrication ample time to soak in, and simply wipe away any excess, before going on that bike ride. Key areas to focus on for lubrication include: breaks, derailleurs, cassettes, chain rings and, of course, the chain. For the breaks and derailleurs, this includes any levers, cables, and their entire assembly.

These are only the basics towards bike maintenance. Supplies you will need include: clean rags, brushes, soap, water, lubricant, degreaser, and a bike stand.

The most important element is to take your time; don’t rush your way through this process. Take care of your bike and it will take care of you. Also, don’t underestimate the advantage of taking your bike into the shop. These tips will help you keep your bike on the road or on the trail more often, but it’s important to get your bike a full checkup every once in a while in addition to these regular efforts.

p.creveling@wasatchmag.com

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Benefits of a Flowfold Trailmate Dog leash

Are you a canine owner?  Are you also an outdoor enthusiast?  If you answered yes to those two questions, then this dog leash is perfect for you.  It is called the flowfold Trailmate Dog leash.  Here are a few things that make it great:

Usability

I’ve had the opportunity to use the leash for the past couple of weeks on dogs of various sizes, ranging from 15 pounds to 55 pounds. The dog leash has consistently performed well on each. For true testing, I have also had various-sized dog walkers test out the leash to see how it holds.  From small kids to full grown adults, this dog leash has proven to work well across the board.

Taking portraits of family at Grandma and Grandpa’s house in Bountiful, UT on Saturday, July 22, 2017
(Photo by Kiffer Creveling)

Fabric

The flowfold Trailmate dog leash is made from rock climbing rope, which means the leash is extremely sturdy and durable.  Another added benefit familiar to all rock climbers is that rock climbing rope stretches.  That means that when a load is applied dynamically–like in the case of a fall– to a climbing rope, there is no sudden jerk but instead a prolonged stretch takes place, to allow energy to spread down the rope before reaching the climber.  This same concept applies to the dog leash.  When you quickly need to restrain your dog from an approaching runner or child, you can pull back abruptly without injuring your dog’s neck with a sudden jerk as the rope slightly stretches to accommodate that new force.

Another added benefit of having a dog leash made from rock climbing rope is that when the rope gets dirty from taking your dog on adventures like desert hiking, cross country skiing, or coastal beaches, cleaning the leash is simple.  After mixing mild soap and water and applying a scrub brush, any residue embedded in the rope will quickly fall off.  After it dries off, the rope will be as good as new.

Style

I’ve seen the other canines around recently, and I’ve paid attention to them.  Their leashes are for the most part boring, simple, and plain.  Sure, they get the job done, but not in style.  When you have this leash on your wrist you feel as if you are wearing a fashion accessory that not only complements your own style but your dog’s too.

Others will ask you where you got your rope and what the diameter is!  At least that is what fellow climbers say when you bring a new rope to the crag.

k.creveling@wasatchmag.com

 

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Gear to Get You Started

Breaking into a new sport can be intimidating and expensive. As any outdoor lover is painfully aware, your gear will burn a hole in your pocket faster than wildfire. Buying into a new activity can put you back a fair bit, especially if you decide you don’t like the sport as much as you first thought. You can start off by renting the essentials, but soon this becomes more costly than just owning the gear yourself. Eventually, you reach a point where an investment is necessary. Here are a few pieces of gear that will maximize what you’re able to do while minimizing the amount of money you need to put in to get started.

Backpack (60 L)

This is the single most important piece of gear any so-called outdoor lover should own. Being able to pack yourself into remote locations and camp is a skill applicable to just about every outdoor sport. Attach your tent — or hammock — and bag peaks in the summer, strap your skis on in the winter and boot pack a chute, carry your rope and climbing shoes with you in the fall and ascend that new route, and/or snuggle your fly rod on in the spring to land that big Brown. Getting a pack 60 liters or larger will allow you ample room to cram in your essentials and get started on some easier overnight trips. Best of all, backpacks can be found at almost every used gear sale. It shouldn’t be too difficult to snag a deal on one.

Climbing Shoes

It seems there are two pseudo-requirements to live and recreate in the Salt Lake area: know how to ski and know how to climb. Both can get pricey fast, but climbing has the cheapest buy in. All you really need is a pair of shoes (and some chalk if you really want to be bougie). From there you can boulder, indoors or out, and see if constantly cramming your fingers in small cracks and holds suits your fancy. If you boulder outdoors be sure to either rent a crash pad ($6 a day from Outdoor Adventures) or pick boulders with soft landings, free of rocks. Like backpacks, climbing shoes are fine to buy used. Just be sure to check the condition of the sole, particularly on the edges, because it tends to get worn away the quickest.

Fly Rod

The Cottonwoods are not just the home of great climbs and powdery runs, but streams and lakes too. Meandering their way through all these are trout: rainbows, brooks, lakes, and browns. You will need a fishing license as well as a rod, but you’ll be able to keep up to four fish a day (unless specific area regulations permit otherwise). For most spots in the Cottonwoods a small, dark fly will work well. Even if you do more fishing than catching, a day spent next to pristine alpine streams and lakes is a day well spent.

Headlamp

Aside from being an extreme luxury/ borderline necessity, a headlamp is vital for caving. All over Utah lie underground tunnels and caverns waiting to be spelunked. While many caves require technical skills and are very easy to get lost in, there are some that are shallow and give just a taste of the bigger systems, like the Snow Canyon Lava Tubes. Wear clothes that you don’t mind getting absolutely filthy and leave your claustrophobia at the entrance.

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

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Spice Up Your Next Adventure

We’ve all silently moaned while pulling out the contents of our food for a weekend backpacking trip. Oatmeal for breakfast, crackers and summer sausage for lunch, and mac and cheese for dinner. And then it’s the same thing the next day. If you want to treat your taste buds while on the trail, Mountain House has you covered. With its two new dehydrated meals — the Spicy Southwest Breakfast Hash and the Chicken Fajita Bowl — you will get unique flavors in each bite.

Blended to Perfection

Many dehydrated meals end up morphing flavors and textures to become a mushy casserole, but you can taste each ingredient in these two dishes — the corn, the shredded beef, and the perfect amount of green chilies. Plus, you’ll also get a mix of vegetables and meat, so each bite has more kick to it than all those mashed potatoes you’re usually chowing down. Ditch the Cholula. The breakfast hash has a few dashes of it already.

Energy Boosting

The breakfast hash provides 11 grams of protein per serving, and the fajita bowl has a whopping 20 grams of protein. After hiking, climbing, or paddling outside all day, it’s nice to give your muscles the recovery they need. They also have some healthy fats to replenish your body’s stores to keep you moving.

Versatile

Either eat the food straight from the package, load it into tortillas, or use it as a topping on crackers. It’s good any way you want to try it. Although one of the options has “breakfast” in its title, that shouldn’t limit your thinking. Eat either as a filler for breakfast burritos, or you can even a hot meal by the campfire at the end of the day.

Convenient

Each pouch weighs about 4 ounces, and it contains two servings. They are a little pricey (both are $8.99 before tax), but think about all the money and time you would have spent buying all the meat, spices, and veggies, dehydrating them, and packing that into Ziploc bags. Plus, these meals are compact, and they can fit into the tight corners of your backpack.

These two meals overall get a 4.5/5. They taste great, and they are easy to cook, but the price does tip me over the edge a little bit. For those wanting to switch up the flavors of their next outdoor trip, you might as well give them a try.

c.webber@wasatchmag.com

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The World in the Palm of Your Hand

This post has been submitted by a guest contributor.

Written by Sally Writes

Remember the days when Global Positioning System (GPS) technology was new and exciting? Now, what once was a luxury is used in a variety of unique ways, from GPS tracking embedded into computers, to dog collars, to drones, and to planes flying through the air.

When exploring the Wasatch area of Utah, such as Wasatch Mountain State Park or the Wasatch Crest Trail, it is beneficial to have your own personal handheld GPS advice to maximize the range and scope of your venture. In recent years, GPS technology has proven to be especially  important for campers and hikers. Handheld GPS devices have   revolutionized the way that we explore, whether it be on a new hiking trail, in the mountains, or even in our own backyards. Knowing the coordinates, the location, and the direction of your adventuring in the Wasatch area will help you to become familiar with the landscape just like a Utah local.

You might ask yourself, “Do I really need another gadget?”

The difference between having a handheld GPS, and any other gadget while hiking or camping around Wasatch is that it can be reached by satellite from anywhere in the world. There is no need to connect it to a Wi-Fi network, or for that matter, any other network. It is trustworthy, it is dependable, and it familiarizes you with the mountainous parks and trails.

Furthermore, they are a safe option if you are exploring areas that are off the usual marked paths. Many handheld GPS devices incorporate a tracking function, which periodically lay down “digital bread crumbs.” or track points at consistent intervals. You can easily retrace your steps with this feature, and you can organize your overall trip data for the various locations in Utah that you wish to see.

Most handheld GPS units are also equipped with software programs that connect to your home computers. This means that you can synchronize any trip or route planning that you do online before visiting the Wasatch area with your handheld. Easily accessing such information while hiking out on the trails is another great benefit of these handy gadgets.

But which unit is best?

These handheld lifelines come in numerous styles and sizes, so it is important that you select the one that is best for you, and your impending explorations. Most handheld GPS devices are waterproof, durable, have an exceptional battery life, and have a distress signal. Be sure that the one you choose is easy to read in all sorts of weather conditions, including at night, in a storm, and in the bright sun.

There are a number of reputable exploration companies that sell quality handheld GPS devices for your trip. (See a list of some of those here). Many of these devices include outstanding features, such as the ability to simultaneously track GPS and GLONASS, another positioning system, satellites. Most important to your decision is that you can easily learn and use all of the handheld GPS’s features so you can gain all of its information benefits while exploring the Wasatch area.

A handheld GPS is a fantastic companion for a trip to the wilderness of  Utah. With tracking features and the ability to reach satellites far and wide, this lifeline will allow you to expand your knowledge and familiarity with the area of Wasatch, right from the palm of your hand.

Want to see your work here? Send story and photo pitches to c.koldewyn@wasatchmag.com.

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The Unlikely Trend of Trucker Hats

Trucker hats and their head-topping ilk are a staple outdoor style trend, one represented in force across the country. Trucker hats are the instant outdoor look creator — you can wear something inside to show people you do cool things outside while simultaneously looking like a classic, hard-working American. However, there’s a conflict though between being a hip, outdoorsy college student and wearing a hat that was made popular by blue-collar workers.

Of course the wacky outdoor niche would pick up on an old trucker style made popular in the late ’70s and ’80s. Originally adopted by flyover-country brands like John Deere, Bud Light, and Chevy — all of which handed out free logo-emblazoned caps at truck stops — this became an iconic look for the average Joe. Then, as a brief stint of research in style history tells me, the trucker hat made a comeback in 2000s mainstream style. In the 2010s or so, the outdoor industry and community finally picked it up in full effect. Patagonia trucker hats seem to be the go-to, with other outdoor brands following behind. They’re worn hiking, biking, skiing, climbing; hats go anywhere from underneath helmets to buried in thick parkas. The dirtbag culture has fully embraced the trend.

At least part of the trucker hat’s popularity can be explained from its functionality, the breathable mesh back provides adequate airflow for intense activities. But, it’s still a little bizarre. Just look at the accompanying dirty flannels, deteriorating jeans, and worn-out Chacos. The trucker hat is the key item to top off the bum look and show everyone else you like to climb rocks. Construction workers and lumberjacks wear flannels, truckers and farmers wear trucker hats. It’s American. Being outside is American, and the ’70s just seems like a classic American decade, right? After my thorough investigation, this is the only reasonable conclusion I can draw as to why trucker hats are so in right now with the out-of-doors crowd. In the end, it’s a simple unspoken rule that the addition of a trucker hat automatically steps up one’s outdoor style game tenfold.

c.hammock@wasatchmag.com

Photo by Chris Hammock

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Wet Your Whistle: Water Purifier Review

In a state like Utah, where most of the best outdoor opportunities are covered in sand and baked in hot sun, water is the most essential resource. No trip will be fun or successful without a few liters of this life-preserving liquid. Humans can’t drink just any water we come across like camel, but we can employ technology to make it safer for consumption. Here are a few of the most common ways to purify water.

LIFESTRAW

This neat little blue straw is by far the trendiest of water purification devices, and for good reason. It is incredibly simple, compact (just nine inches long and weighs two ounces), and allows you to drink from just about any water source. There’s no pre-filtering or skimming out silt. It’s just dunk and drink. However, the straw requires you to be at a water source or carry one with you. Pairing the Lifestraw with a Nalgene is not a bad way to combat this, but drinking out of a bottle with an oversized straw is more than just a slight inconvenience. Having to stop every few minutes, unscrew your bottle, put the straw in, then blow the excess water back out of the straw can quickly become tedious. Even worse, it can’t be used with water bladders. At $20 though, there is no reason not to pick one up. Lifestraw’s small size and versatility make it the optimal backup water purifier to keep in your pack at all times.

 

KATADYN HIKER

This is often the go-to filter for big group trips. It has the ability to purify large amounts of water reasonably quickly (only a few minutes per Nalgene), and does not require any wait time. You could drink the water right from the out-hose if you wanted. The downsides are that it requires some physical effort to pump multiple liters of water, and the filters are easily clogged. If this happens and there isn’t a replacement available, the pump might still work, but it will be painfully, infuriatingly slow. Be sure to check and double check the condition of the filter before leaving. Pumping in shallow, sandy areas or in very murky water is almost sure to stuff up the filter. While the most expensive filter on the list, averaging about $70, the Katadyn is still well worth it.

 

STERIPEN

Of all the water purifiers out there, this one is perhaps the least suited to backpacking. The UV light that the SteriPEN uses to kill all the harmful bacteria can only work in perfectly clear water. If there are objects floating around or silt obstructing the UV rays, the bacteria have a much higher chance at survival and you have a much higher chance of diarrhea. This filter is best for travel or a home preparedness kit. At around $60, it’s steeper than a Lifestraw anyways.

 

 

 

IODINE/CHLORINE TABLETS

Depending on the water source, this can be the most efficient (and painless) method of cleaning your water. All that is required is filling the bottles with water clear enough to not gross you out and adding the correct amount of chemicals. Instructions are on the package, but typically the ratio is one chlorine tablet or a few drops of iodine per liter of water. Allow the chemical the correct amount of time to work its magic (length also shown on product package) and remember to bleed the threads before drinking. This means turning the water bottle upside down and unscrewing the lid a little so some can leak out through the threads of the top. If not, you could end up getting Giardia from the little bits of unpurified water sitting trapped in the cap. Katadyn makes Micropur chlorine tablets that run for $20 for a pack of 20 tablets. Polar Pure makes an iodine cleaner for $20 that is able to purify 2,000 quarts.

 

n.halberg@wasatchmag.com

Feature Photo courtesy of Aquamira

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