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Tips

Keeping Warm in the Great Outdoors

Raise your hand if you’ve been personally victimized by the ice-cold temperatures while trying to enjoy the great outdoors. Whether you’re hiking or camping, staying warm is the only way to have a safe and enjoyable trip. If anyone claims they like being cold, they’re lying. Here are a few tips and tricks to staying warm during your winter adventures.

Keeping warm requires a variety of tools and tips during Utah’s cold months. Photo by Annie Duong.

Pack the Hand and Toe Warmers 

Keeping your hands and feet warm is essential to not losing a finger or toe to frostbite. No one wants to go through the trauma of that, so listen to the nagging voice of your parental figure in the back of your mind, and pack some hand/toe warmers, some nice thick socks, and gloves.

Stick to the Three-Layer Rule

This may be common sense but it’s important to make sure you have a tight-fitting base layer, a middle layer, and an outer layer. For your base layer, it’s best to have a synthetic or wool article of clothing. DO NOT WEAR COTTON. Cotton is very loosely knitted and takes a very long time to dry. Your middle layer should retain heat. Fabrics like merino wool, down and/or fleece are suggested. Finally, your outer layer should protect you from the elements so it should be windproof, waterproof and well ventilated. Just remember the three Ws: wicking, warmth, and weather.

Two Beanies are Better than One

Not only will you be the most stylish individual in your group, but you’ll also be the most prepared. If you didn’t know, you lose a lot of heat from your head, so it’s best to always have a beanie or warm hat. Bringing two can ensure you’ll have a dry and comfortable beanie to wear at all times. This goes for clothing, too. Wearing wet clothing will 110 percent make you colder than if your clothes were completely dry, so doubling up is a necessity.

Chug Olive Oil

Apparently chugging things like olive oil, and eating avocados and other foods high in fat content, will help keep you warm. The burning of calories leads to an elevated body temperature, so bottoms up. I’m sure to most people olive oil does not sound appealing to drink, so any alternatives that are high in carbs and fat (like chocolate and/or nuts) will keep your internal furnace well fueled.

Keep Your Butt off the Ground

Never leave the fire or you’ll freeze your butt off, and try not to sit directly on the cold ground or on rocks. That goes for sleeping as well. Be sure to sleep on a sleeping pad or a cot to ensure maximum heat insulation. For below freezing temperatures, shoot for at least two or three inches of insulation between you and the ground when sleeping.

Make Yourself a “Crotch Bottle”

Think back to a cold, dreadful night in your tent. Do you remember where your hands were for the majority of the night? Probably in between your thighs, right? There are important arteries in your inner thighs that are essential to regulating body temperature; so don’t put away the kettle or jet-boil just yet. Use this to fill that extra water bottle you packed with hot water and get cozy with it in your sleeping bag, placed perfectly between your thighs to keep your body temperature up.

Big Spoon or Little Spoon?

Don’t know your tent mate? Suck it up, buttercup. Get your pillow talk ready. It’s common knowledge that sharing body heat keeps you warm, why not do it?

Don’t Get Trashed

Even though chugging olive oil isn’t as appealing as the whiskey you packed, a liquor blanket can only get you so far into the night. I’m sure half the reason you’re going camping is to sit around the fire with a beer or bottle, but drinking alcohol makes you dehydrated, and dehydration makes you cold. That warm, fuzzy feeling inside is a trap. You are colder than you think; limit your drinks and make sure those friends of yours who maybe aren’t as careful don’t pass out in unsafe conditions.

Drink Lots and Lots of Water

If you’re like me, being out in the cold doesn’t particularly make me thirsty. The truth is though, the cold, dry winter air actually dehydrates you faster than warmer air. Obviously, water keeps you alive and well but sometimes it’s an easy need to ignore. As your body is working harder to generate heat under all your layers, water is vital. To keep your water from freezing, use a wool sock, invest in an insulated bottle, or use a DIY foam sleeve.

Splurge on Nice Gear

If you do enough cold weather camping, it may be time to invest in some high-quality gear. This isn’t really a tip but you’ll definitely feel a difference between that $30 sleeping bag compared to a $300 one. I’m not telling you to go buy the latest and greatest equipment, but it may be time to do a little research and invest.

a.duong@wasatchmag.com

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Eating Outside the Pack

I don’t know about anyone else, but when I camp, cooking is the last thing that comes to mind. My preparation for any outdoor adventure revolves around gear and water. I’m perfectly happy living off of granola bars, trail mix, and fruit if it’s a short trip; but we all know that is not enough to survive anything longer. A fulfilling, hearty meal is key if you want the energy to play all day–and here are some of my favorite and easy meals you can use for any outdoor adventure.

All these meals can be fully prepped before your adventure even begins; a quick run to the grocery store should be the most complicated part. These recipes can provide the hearty nutrition you need to enjoy the outdoors to their greatest capacity, without draining much of your precious adventuring time. Campfire French Toast, Walking Tacos, and Tinfoil BBQ Chicken – all three are based around easy purchases and simple methods. All you need are a few simple ingredients, a campfire, the great outdoors, and good company. They were all found on Pinterest; and there are plenty more where they came from.

Campfire French Toast

Ingredients:

1 loaf of bread

2 eggs

1 cup of milk (or premade French toast mix)

1 tsp. cinnamon

1 cup of fruit (optional)

Syrup of choice (optional)

Supplies:

Aluminum foil

Parchment paper

Mixing bowl

Instructions:

If you decide to not use the premade: mix eggs, cinnamon and milk.

Loosely wrap the load in parchment paper and tin foil so the bread slices fall slightly open.

Sprinkle fruit over loaf.

Pour egg mixture over entire loaf.

Set in an area of the fire where there is no open flame or coals (or, in other words, cook in low to medium heat).

Cook for 6-10 minutes before serving with syrup.

Walking Tacos

Ingredients:

1 package/roll ground beef

1 packet of taco seasoning

2 tomatoes (diced)

1 bag of shredded lettuce

1 small tub of sour cream

1 package of shredded cheese

1 large bag/mini bags of Fritos

Supplies:

Nothing at all

(Maybe a bowl/cup)

Instructions:

To make a quick and easy meal, I would suggest prepping everything before the trip.

Cook beef until well-browned. Add taco seasoning.

Dice fresh tomatoes.

Crush chips in hands and add toppings into snack sized bags to combine in taco when eating.

Note: If you don’t have snack-sized, mix crushed chips and toppings together now, and enjoy later!

Tinfoil BBQ Chicken

Ingredients:

1 rotisserie chicken (or any precooked chicken)

1 bottle of BBQ sauce

Any kind of chopped vegetables

Supplies:

Aluminum foil

Instructions:

Shred cooked chicken.

Dice chosen vegetables.

Mix chicken, vegetables and BBQ sauces together.

Wrap mixture fully in tin foil.

Cook for 5-10 minutes in fire or until hot.

a.duong@wasatchmag.com

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Post-Trail Utah Eateries

Picture this: You have just finished backpacking for five days in the Wasatch Mountains. You are exhausted from hiking an average 10 miles a day, plus a little extra on the fourth day because you took a wrong turn. You have had nothing to eat besides cheese, crackers, filtered water, trail mix, and your assorted favorites of freeze-dried foods. On your way out, you can think of nothing else but your favorite eatery. Literally nothing else besides the next bite of food that you will be consuming. But where do you go? Here is a short list of my absolute favorite places to satisfy the overwhelming need to gorge myself.

Moab Brewery

If you find yourself venturing out in Moab, Utah exploring the vast amounts of red rock and national parks, but you are staying near or in town, you’ll find plenty of locations to indulge yourself with food. Over the many years that I have traveled to the area and explored the landscape, there is one place that I keep coming back to in order to ease my way back into society: That place is Moab Brewery (686 S. Main St, Moab, UT 84532). Whether you consume alcohol or not, this is the place for you. Some of my best memories of eating come from sitting at their tables. Their food is worth it, I guarantee it. My personal favorite is the Jack Daniels Burger. If you have had it before, you know what I’m talking about. If not, what are you waiting for?!

Porcupine Pub & Grille

Another great location is the Porcupine Grille located at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon (3698 Fort Union Blvd, Salt Lake City, UT 84121). To this day, this pub and grill has the best nachos known to humankind. After ski days, camping trips, rock climbing, excursions or mountain biking adventures, I always make a stop here. The best part about their nachos is the portions: this appetizer is perfect for an entire family, or a group of three ravished climbers. Porcupine Grill’s convenient location and delicious food makes this place perfect for anyone to stop by after a day in the Wasatch.

Lone Star Taqueria

The other restaurant in my top three is Lone Star Taqueria located in Cottonwood Heights (2265 Fort Union Blvd, Cottonwood Heights, UT 84121). This place has some of the best authentic Mexican food in town for a reasonable price. They are especially known for their fish tacos and large portions, and I have to agree wholeheartedly that they deliver on both. Even though Lone Star Taqueria is a smaller restaurant, the atmosphere is perfect. Be sure to sit on their outdoor patio and enjoy the scenery up against the mountains while you reminisce in the memories you have just made.

These are only a few places to stop by in order to curb your hunger after a great adventure in the outdoors­–there are many hidden gems located throughout Utah so have some fun finding new haunts on your own. Ask people in the area where the best places are to stop by. My recommendation? Always find the place where the line is out the door. You won’t be steered in the wrong direction.

p.creveling@wasatchmag.com

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A Different Outdoor Adventure

I’ve always loved the feeling of going fast, whether it be repelling quickly down a 180 foot crevasse or driving down a desolate stretch of desert highway. Now, as we enter into the peak of climbing season, I’ve started to combine my passion for climbing with motorcycle riding.

There’s nothing like sitting on an engine, gripping your handlebars, wind whipping against your body, and ground passing beneath your feet. Motorcycle riding is an environment of the senses, and if you’re into nature, hiking, or any sort of outdoorsy activity, motorcycles are a great way to extend this lifestyle.

It’s pretty cool to hop onto a machine that demands every ounce of your attention. You become more aware of your surroundings, the smells in the air, and the outdoor temperature. There is no other way to put it; riding is full of fun and adrenaline.

It really doesn’t matter what kind of motorcycle you have. Whether you ride a vintage cafe racer or an Enduro bike, keep pushing yourself and think of new ways that you can enjoy the hobbies and sports you love.

My preference is an Enduro 650 CC bike, which gives you the option to ride on highways or take on some challenging dirt roads. REI is the perfect store to purchase any compact, light-weight gear you might need to strap on your bike. I prefer Enduristan Monsoon 3 for saddle bags, a tank bag, and dehydrated food when I go on long adventures. It’s true that we live in a time where comfort is often our first priority — with a bike, you don’t get that luxury. You only have room for the essentials. But don’t worry, you can still have that perfect trip. Just avoid packing everything you think you might need, and instead plan to pick things up along the way or restock things you do have as they get low.

s.guirguis@wasatchmag.com

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