Hiking with a Furry Loved One

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As much as my dog loves lounging around the house, Phillip also needs an open field or dirt to frolic about in with his furry friends. With the warm weather, Phillip and I have caught the spring fever bug early. Thankfully, if an urban stroll down the sidewalk isn’t fulfilling, there are plenty of (more exciting) alternatives for you and your canine companion.

Photo by Annie Duong.

Even though many of our beautiful mountain trails do not allow canine visitors, there are still some great wooded areas for dogs and their humans to play in the wilderness. Don’t let the ease of jumping in the car and driving less than 20 minutes to go play in the mountains with your dog fool you, though. You should always be prepared for not only yourself, but the furry love of your life as well. Watch out for:

-Mud: Since our so-called “winter” likes to come and go as it pleases here in Utah, trails can be wet and/or muddy. You may want to bring an extra towel and some wipes for the ride home. No one likes a muddy pup AND a muddy car.

-Other humans and dogs: There’s a very big chance you’ll run into other humans and dogs so be prepared to get your dog to your side quickly if they aren’t great in social settings. Don’t forget extra poop baggies! (I didn’t bring enough and had to bum some off a fellow human.)

-Sparse parking: Snow banks or wet terrain can prevent certain cars from parking. While some canyons close down parts of the road during the winter/spring season (like Millcreek Canyon), some hikes and their parking areas may not be available.

-Temperature change: Even though it’s warm in the valley doesn’t mean it’ll be warm in the mountains or shaded areas. Make sure to bring extra layers just in case.

-Food, water, etc.: Don’t forget hiking with your dog is different from an urban stroll through the neighborhood. Make sure to know your dog’s limit. Just like humans, they get tired, thirsty, and hungry when playing outdoors. Make sure to bring enough treats and water for the both of you.

Remember to follow all the rules for your pets and clean up after them. Now that that’s clear, here are a few places to try.

Tanner Park

2760 Heritage Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84109

This park is not necessarily a “dog park” but does allow leashed dogs on the majority of its trails. With trails and open areas accessible all year round, Tanner Park dips down into a gully with an exciting off-leash area where humans can let their dogs play in the creek. This off-leash area does not have any fencing, so if your furry friend likes to wander, make sure to keep an eye on them. This is a full hike, so be sure you and your dog are in shape enough to hike back out of Tanner Park. Tip: To avoid receiving a ticket, make sure to keep your dog leashed until you pass the “off-leash” sign.

Millcreek Canyon

3800 Millcreek Canyon Rd, Salt Lake City, UT 84124Millcreek Canyon has trails for all humans and dogs. With difficulty levels that range from nature stroll to cross-country treks, this canyon will give you and your dog a variety of hikes to choose from. While on even dated days of every month (the 2nd, 4th and so on), dogs must stay on their leashes, on odd dated days they are allowed to have off-leash fun. This gives your dog the freedom to run up and down the trail while hiking.

Red Butte Canyon Research Natural Area

383 Colorow Rd, Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Most locals know this area mainly for a hike called The Living Room. The Red Butte Canyon Area has plenty of easy, flat trails suitable for all ages and skill levels. While the surrounding trails are great for everyone, The Living Room Trail can be a bit strenuous with its inclines. If you and your dog don’t like it ruff, I’d make sure to give yourself and your dog extra time, snacks, and water to ensure a safe and fun hike. Though there are not any specific rules about leashing, it’s common for dogs to be off leash. 

Memory Grove/City Creek Canyon Trail

300 Canyon Rd, Salt Lake City, UT 84103This beautiful little park is nestled away near the Greater Avenues. While your dogs must be leashed in the majority of the park, Memory Grove offers an off-leash trail and area in the most northern part of the park. In my experience, the dogs and their humans are the nicest here. It’s a great place to socialize your pup while being able to enjoy nature and the presence of others.

Other Great Dog Parks

As busy human beings, it can sometimes be a hassle to prepare and head to the mountains with your dog. So here are some other great dog-friendly parks within the valley that will keep your pup happy and will allow you to relax and decompress from the business around.

Lindsay Garden Dog Park: 426 M St, Salt Lake City, UT 84103Herman Franks Dog Park: 1371 700 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84105Wasatch Hollow Dog Park: 1631 E 1700 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84105

Liberty Park: 600 E 900 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84105

Sugarhouse Park: 1330 2100 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84106

Photo by Annie Duong.

a.duong@wasatchmag.com

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